Perpetual Paper Play

 

Happy 2015! I entered the new year surrounded by piles of folded paper forms (again!) this week.

 

I've been busy testing out a new camera and the new spotlights in the recently refurbished learning studio at the Hepworth Wakefield over the festive break. I've really enjoyed capturing the amazing ideas and creations people have come up with in my 3D Structures workshop, in response to a large-scale, geometric foot by Toby Ziegler, commissioned as part of the Conflict and Collisions: New Contemporary Sculpture exhibition. The exhibition coincides with WWI commemorations and juxtaposes historical battle scenes with contemporary sculpture, considering themes of war (historical and contemporary), the inter-relation of humans and machines, digital technologies and 3D printing. 

 

I wanted to examine the nature of paper folding as a way to demonstrate geometrical constructions, creating repeat shapes, patterns, positives, negatives, and concrete or abstract 3D forms. Ziegler's sculpture was partly created through machine but finished by hand and it was this interplay I found interesting to question. In the case of the studio workshop, participants explored the art of folding, geometry, symmetry and reflection with various templates or tessellating prints which they could either completely ignore or use as starting points for geometric 3D forms. 

 

Some focused on the theme of war, creating paper sculpted dioramas of war machinery, escape tunnels and air-raid bunkers or strange war-like creatures. Others took a more positive approach and for many children (and adults), their folded forms began to represent mini architectural models for utopian playgrounds, perhaps inspired by the play area outside. In any case, I was blown away by the work created.

 

Start the new year as you mean to go on.